Roasting this Winter

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We already own it, so don’t worry we’re not getting paid to promote it.

I’ve been browsing  Alice Water’s cookbook, The Art of Simple Food.  Though at first I was skeptical, I prefer cookbooks with titles like, Meat, I was won over by Waters who uses every opportunity to stress the importance of purchasing meat that is “raised with care.”  She talks about how you can purchase organic chicken direct from the farmer, at the farmers market or at your local market. She even suggests that if your local market doesn’t carry organic chicken to create demand by asking them to stock it. Alice Waters, thank you.

As I’ve always been very cavalier in my approach to cooking most any meat; I’ve realized quickly, standing next to Jake at farmers market, that cooking advice can often make or break sales. People often worry, aloud,  that grass-fed meats will be tougher, but Jake and I know that proper cooking method ensure our meat tastes its best.  So, I’ve decided to share some tips from Alice Waters;

Choose a pan slightly larger than your roast to avoid unsightly splatter in your oven and to conserve pan drippings for gravy-yum!
Heat oven to 375 degrees.
To achieve medium to rare in your roasts use the following temperature guide:
For lamb or goat take meat out at 128 degrees
For beef take meat out at 120-125 degrees

Finally, for all cuts let rest 20 minutes after removing from the oven. The meat doesn’t stop cooking when it is pulled from the oven, but as it rests the internal temperature increases for a while. If you cut that roast when you take it out of the oven the inside will be underdone and the juices will run more quickly, creating unevenly cooked, dry slices. Allowing time for rest means the juices stay in the roast and meat will be much more succulent. Enjoy!

Springtime in Maine

Like you might expect Maine weather is never predictable nor dependable. Sunny days when rain is forecasted and rain when, well rain quite often. The pastures are still a bit soggy but the clearing/cleaning project for our east pasture is moving at a brisk pace. The cows and calves have been moved to a temporary oval pasture in the west mainly because they’ve been bawling for grass…and Jimmo and Lolabell made a late afternoon escape for the fresh spring clover.

The Bowdoinham Farmer’s Market begins May 23 and we will have lamb meat products, eggs, and wool. The market is located in the Merrymeeting Grange at 27 Main Street and is open from 9 – 1. For more information of other vendors go to: http://www.bowdoinham.com/farmersmarket

no sitting around

May 1st we got all those little lambs separated from their mommas. 48 hours of non-stop baa-ing.

May 2nd and the asparagus is beginning to poke forth from the soil. two shoots for dinner tonight, more by the end of the week for sure.


We’ve begun expanding the garden slightly – making more room for more potatoes, sweet corn, and asparagus. Finally we spread some black gold over the garden….